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Monday, January 19, 2015

Leonardo's The Lady with an Ermine Takes Comes Alive in 3D




 Art
In a new exhibit, Leonardo3-The World of Leonardo, viewers can take in the renaissance master's work in new ways, including a portrait that comes to life.
The famous painting, "Lady with an Ermine," by Leonardo Da Vinci takes to life, reconstructed in 3D in a new video.
The animation is used in a new multimedia exhibit, "Leonardo3-The World of Leonardo," at the Piazza della Scala in Milan. Using a touchscreen, users can see the portrait moving her eyes, yawning, and caressing her little pet.

Lady with an Ermine in 3D



Thursday, November 13, 2014

Incredible Nano-Scale Sculptures Are 3D Printed So Small A Human Hair Is Gigantic In Comparison



Incredible Nano-Scale Sculptures Are 3D Printed So Small A Human Hair Is Gigantic In Comparison
 
Sculpture
Jonty Hurwitz's nano sculptures were created using bleeding-edge technology.  Too small for the naked eye to see, the sculptures were created using multiphoton lithography.
Aartist Jonty Hurwitz’s new sculpture series recreates the smallest human form ever at 20x80x100 microns, a scale too small to be seen by the naked eye. According to Hurwitz’s website, the size of these sculptures approximately equals the amount your fingernails grow every 5 or 6 hours.

The sculptures, “Trust”, “Cupid and Psyche: The First Kiss”, and “Intensity”, explore the idea of science vs. legend, myth vs. reality.

They were created using a ground-breaking new nano 3D printing technology and a technique called multiphoton lithography. Ultimately these works are created using the physical phenomenon of two photon absorption. As Hurwitz puts it, his art is literally created with quantum physics.

When a light-sensitive polymer is illuminated with ultra violet wavelengths, it solidifies wherever it was irradiated in a kind of crude lump. Some of you may have experienced a polymer like this first hand at the dentist when your filling is glued in with a UV light.

If however longer wavelength light is used, and focused tightly through a microscope, at the focus point, the polymer absorbs two photons and responds as if it had been illuminated by UV light. This solidifies the polymer.

Cupid and Psyche: The First Kiss
 Cupid and Psyche: The First Kiss

Cupid and Psyche: The First Kiss
 Cupid and Psyche: The First Kiss

 Cupid and Psyche: The First Kiss


  Cupid and Psyche: The First Kiss


Intensity
 Intensity

Making of Trust - 3D Scan
Making of Trust - 3D Scan

Trust in a Needle
Trust in a Needle

This two photon absorption occurs only at the tiny focal point - basically a tiny 3D pixel (called a Voxel). The sculpture is then moved along fractionally by a computer controlled process and the next pixel is created. Slowly, over hours and hours the entire sculpture is assembled pixel by pixel and layer by layer.

"We live in an era where the impossible has finally come to pass. In our own little way we have become demi-gods of creation. "Contemporary" art, in my humble view, needs to reflect the human condition as it is today, it needs to represent the state of society at the time of its creation," states Hurwitz.  "Take a moment to consider that only 6,000 years ago we were painting crude animal images on the walls of caves with rocks. We have come far. This nano sculpture is the collective achievement of all of humanity.  It is the culmination of thousands of years of R&D."


SOURCE  Jonty Hurwitz

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Friday, October 17, 2014

Incredible Computer Graphics Bring Orangutan To Life




 Uncanny Valley
It is hard to believe that the orangutan, "Maya," in a new commercial for the Scottish electrical utility is a real, well trained animal actor—she's not, she's 100% computer generated.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Infographics Designers' Sketchbooks



Infographics Designers' Sketchbooks

 Books
In Infographic Designers' Sketchbooks, more than fifty of the world's leading graphic designers and illustrators open up their private sketchbooks to offer a rare glimpse of their creative processes. 
We are living in a golden age of data visualization, in which designers are responding to the information overload of our digital era with astonishing feats of visual thinking.

Using a wide variety of techniques, they transform complex ideas into clear, engaging, and memorable infographics. In recent years, books and websites have been collecting the field's best. While stimulating, these finished projects offer little insight into how visual solutions were reached, making them of limited use to designers wanting to produce work of their own.

In Infographics Designers' Sketchbooks, more than fifty of the world's leading graphic designers and illustrators open up their private sketchbooks to offer a rare glimpse of their creative processes.

Infographics Designers' Sketchbooks

Emphasizing idea-generating methods—from doodles and drawings to three-dimensional and digital mock-ups—this revelatory collection is the first to go inside designers' studios to reveal the art and craft behind infographic design. —

Organized alphabetically by designer, Infographic Designers' Sketchbooks combines both breadth and depth in 352-pages. The topics span range from politics to science to pop culture to finance.

The book excels at showing how essentially dry, complex scientific information is brought to life by storybook-like infographic imagery embedded with raw data. Still, however polished the final product is and whatever data it represents, the common theme is a good old-fashioned sketch at the start.

Infographics Designers' Sketchbooks

It is incredibly interesting to go behind the scenes of a designer’s work process, through their sketches.

Author Steven Heller is the cochair of the MFA Designer as Author Department at NY's School of Visual Arts. He is the author of many books, including Graphic, Typography Sketchbooks, Scripts, and Shadow Type.

Co-author Rick Landers is founding partner and co-creative director of graphic design studio Landers Miller Design.


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Tuesday, March 18, 2014

The Realistic Chiaroscuro Shades of DiegoKoi



DiegoKoi pencil drawing

 DiegoKoi
The young self-taught artist known as DiegoKoi uses outstanding pencil technique to create hyper-realistic portraits.
Diego Fazio, also known as DiegoKoi is a young self-taught artist living in Italy. He began his career designing tattoos and perfected his photo realistic technique with hundreds of shades of chiaroscuro over a period of several years.

In his home country, he won an award in 2011 for Best New Artist and has been gaining fame and accolades every since. With art like this, it’s easy to see why.

All of DiegoKoi's work is done by pencil. He is dedicated to the creation of figure and portrait drawings giving them a great sense of the personal.  This expression comes from within each subject through sensible lines that surrounded the subject, giving rise to compact shapes and elastic form, supported by shadows and imagination.

DiegoKoi pencil drawing

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

The Stark and Stunning Realistic Landscapes of Zaria Forman



The Stark and Stunning Realistic Landscapes of Zaria Forman

 Zaria Forman
The photo realistic pastel drawings of Zaria Forman, record the ever-changing beauty of regions affected by climate change.
Zaria Forman, takes up to a month to complete one of her beautiful pastel landscapes.  Through her art, the goal is to document the ever-changing beauty of regions affected by climate change.

Forman's drawings were recently used in the set design for the Netflix series, House of Cards.

Forman, from Brooklyn in New York, USA, led an Arctic expedition to the north west coast of Greenland purposely with the aim of creating art inspired by the dramatic geography.

Her mother, Rena Bass Forman, originally came up with the idea but died before her daughter could see it through, and so she promised to carry out the journey in her name.

Thompson Lake #4
25"x42", Soft Pastel on Paper, 2010

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

The Art of Product Design




 Design
The Art of Product Design by Hardi Meybaum explains the rise of Open Engineering, a way of breaking down barriers and taking advantage of web-based communities, knowledge, and tools to accelerate the design and manufacturing processes.
Product development is a team sport, but most companies don't practice it that way. Organizations should be drawing on the creativity of engaged customers and outsiders, but instead they rely on the same small group of internal "experts" for new ideas. Designers and engineers should be connecting with marketing, sales, customer support, suppliers, and most importantly, customers. The Art of Product Design: Changing How Things Get Madeexplains the rise of "Open Engineering," a way of breaking down barriers and taking advantage of web-based communities, knowledge, and tools to accelerate the design and manufacturing processes.

The book helps explain how to establish open flows of information inside and outside an organization, increasing the quality and frequency of input from different groups and stakeholders.

Friday, February 7, 2014

Joe Fenton's Incredible Surreal Graphite Drawings




 Joe Fenton
London-based artist Joe Fenton creates large drawings using graphite, ink and acrylics on paper over many weeks and months.  His surreal visions examine death and the meaning of life.
Joe Fenton is a London based artist that works mainly in monochrome. His large drawings are produced using graphite, ink and acrylics on paper.

Fenton's art work is influenced by many of the early surrealists. Embracing the grotesque by his employment of Hieronymus Bosch like figures that are gangly, writhing and cramped.

Fenton also uses motifs that suggest Eastern philosophy and Middle Eastern architecture whilst maintaining a feel for European Baroque and Rococo with complex frame ornamentation and plant like details. A common theme in all his works which recurs again and again is that of death and the fear of death. The fanciful and even freakish nature of his images seem to spring from the need to distance himself from the fear while at the same time acknowledging it.

Joe Fenton Art

Friday, October 4, 2013

Exploring the Floating Worlds of Edward Gorey



Exploring the Floating Worlds of Edward Gorey

 Art
Nowadays, receiving a hand written letter appears quaint and charming—making the newly released images of the illustrated envelopes that legendary artist Edward Gorey sent his then-editor Peter F. Neumeyer, even more enticing.
The artist Edward Gorey and his editor Peter Neumeyer met in the summer of 1968. Gorey had been contracted by Addison-Wesley to illustrate Donald and the . . . , a children’s story written by Neumeyer. On their first encounter, Neumeyer managed to dislocate Gorey’s shoulder when he grabbed his arm to keep him from falling into the ocean. In a hospital waiting room, they pored over Gorey’s drawings for the first time together, and Gorey infused the situation with much hilarity. This was the beginning of an invigorating friendship, fueled by a wealth of letters and postcards that sped between the two men through the fall of 1969.

Those letters, published here for the first time in the book, Floating Worlds are remarkable for their quantity and their content. While the creative collaborations of Gorey and Neumeyer centered on children’s books, they held wide-ranging interests; both were erudite, voracious readers, and they sent each other many volumes. Through their discussions of these books, one marvels at the beauty of thoughtful (and merry) discourse driven by intellectual curiosity.



The letters also paint an intimate portrait of Edward Gorey, a man often mischaracterized as macabre or even ghoulish. His gentleness, humility, and brilliance—interwoven with his distinctive humor—shine in each letter; his deft artistic hand is evident on the decorated envelopes addressed to Neumeyer, thirty-eight of which are reproduced in Floating Worlds.

Edward Gorey

During the time of their correspondence, Peter Neumeyer was an assistant professor at Harvard University and then a professor at Stony Brook University in New York. His acumen and compassion, expressed in his discerning, often provocative missives, reveal him to be an ideal creative and intellectual ally for Gorey.

More than anything else, Floating Worlds is the moving memoir of an extraordinary friendship. Gorey wrote that he felt that they were “part of the same family, and I don’t mean just metaphorically. I guess that even more than I think of you as a friend, I think of you as my brother.” Neumeyer stated, “Your letters . . . your existence has made something of this world that [it] hadn’t the possibility of before.”
Edward Gorey illustrated envelope

Edward Gorey letter

Edward Gorey illustrated letter

Edward Gorey illustrated envelope
A truly prodigious and original artist, Gorey (1925-2000), gave to the world over one hundred works, including The Gashlycrumb Tinies, The Doubtful Guest and The Wuggly Ump; prize-winning set and costume designs for innumerable theater productions from Cape Cod to Broadway; a remarkable number of illustrations in publications such as The New Yorker and The New York Times, and in books by a wide array of authors from Charles Dickens to Edward Lear, Samuel Beckett, John Updike, Virginia Woolf, H.G. Wells, Florence Heide and many others. His well known animated credits for the PBSMystery series have introduced him to millions of television viewers. Gorey's masterful pen and ink illustrations and his ironic, offbeat humor have brought him critical acclaim and an avid following throughout the world.
Edward Gorey illustrated envelope

Exploring the Floating Worlds of Edward Gorey

Edward Gorey Letter


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Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Box Integrates Graphics, Acting and Robotics In Brilliant Piece



E

 Film
What do you get when you combine robotics, projection-mapped 3D computer graphics, and an actor all working together in perfect synchronization. It's a five-minute short film called "The Box" — and it is amazing.
What do you get when you combine robotics, projection-mapped 3D computer graphics, and an actor all working together in perfect synchronization. It's a five-minute short film called "The Box" — and it is amazing.

The short film was produced by San Francisco-based design and engineering firm Bot & Dolly.

The creators describe the film as being both an “artistic statement and technical demonstration”, one that explores “the synthesis of real and digital space through projection mapping on moving surfaces”.

The creative director for Box is Tarik Abdel-Gawad, who also worked on the upcoming film, Gravity, controlling robotics for the complicated special effects sequences of the film.

Bot & Dolly - Box

Box

“Box” explores the synthesis of real and digital space through projection-mapping on moving surfaces. The short film documents a live performance, captured entirely in camera. Bot & Dolly produced this work to serve as both an artistic statement and technical demonstration. It is the culmination of multiple technologies, including large scale robotics, projection mapping, and software engineering. We believe this methodology has tremendous potential to radically transform theatrical presentations, and define new genres of expression.

To create this stunning effect, Bot & Dolly used an actor, two high-resolution projectors, two 2D monitors, and three industrial robots (one for the camera) that were synchronized and controlled by integrating their own software with Autodesk Maya.

Box Integrates Graphics, Acting and Robotics In Brilliant Piece

What is more amazing is that this is a live performance captured in-camera.


SOURCE  Colossal

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Monday, June 10, 2013

Remembering Niels Diffrient



Niels Diffrient

 Design
The iconic American industrial designer, Niels Diffrient has passed away at the age of 84.  Diffrient will be remembered for his bringing ergonomics to the fore in design and for his famous Freedom Chair.
N iels Diffrient was a pioneer of ergonomic design -- taking the radical approach of examining the human body as it interacts with furniture, and asking, Is there a better way to sit?

The iconic American designer has passed away at the age of 84.

Diffrient's three-volume reference work, Humanscale, explores the relationship of spine to chair and other "human engineering" data necessary for highly specialized workplaces such as a cockpit or a truck cab, as well as aiding in the search for the perfectly comfortable place to sit down.

In the field of furniture design, most notably ergonomic seating, Niels won a total of 24 awards, including two Best of Show and 10 Gold and Top awards. Diffrient holds more than 46 design and utility patents on furniture designs in America and abroad, and his many honors include the I.D. (magazine) Top 40 Design Innovators of 1996, the 1996 Chrysler Award for Innovation, the Smithsonian’s 2002 Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award for Product Design, and the 2005 Legend Award from Contract magazine.

Niels Diffrient Freedom Chair

Thursday, May 30, 2013

YoAz - Electro Animals



Yo Az - Electro Animals
 Graphic Design
Graphic designer and illustrator YoAz has created “Electro Animals,” a collection of colorful animal illustrations made of geometric, electric circuit-like designs.
French graphic designer and illustrator YoAz has created “Electro Animals,” a collection of colorful animal illustrations made of geometric, electric circuit-like designs. More of the awesome designs as well as detailed closeups of the work can be viewed at YoAz’s Behance portfolio.

It was Philip K. Dick who asked Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and while Yo Az doesn’t appear to be robot. the artist dreams up electric creatures from a few slightly different species.
YOAZ Bear

Monday, April 29, 2013

Reference Images From Classic Disney Animation



Reference Images From Sleeping Beauty

 Animation
Check out this wonderful series of Disney cartoon scenes superimposed on their real life models.
T his series of images features some of the classic Disney cartoon scenes superimposed on their real life model that were used. It is not clear if the actors' movements were used for rotoscoping, but the actors clearly influence the animation.


Reference Images From Disney's Cinderella


Reference Images From Classic Disney Animation

Reference Images From Sleeping Beuaty

Reference Images From Snow White

Reference Images From Peter Pan

Reference Images From Alice in Wonderland

SOURCE  Retronaut

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